Emotional: Humiliating the victim in front of friends or making the victim feel guilty when she confronts the abuser about the abuse.

Intimidation: Making the victim fearful by using threatening behavior, abuse of animals, verbal aggression or destruction of property.

Emotional or psychological violence: The abuser’s psychological or mental attack may include constant verbal abuse, harassment, excessive possessiveness, isolation from friends and family, deprivation of physical and economic resources, and destruction of personal property.

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Coercion: Threatening to find someone else if the dating partner doesn't comply with the abuser's wishes or demands.

Threats to harm self or others if the dating partner leaves.

At the beginning stages of the dating relationship, these behaviors may not be apparent or the use of them is so subtle that they may be mistaken for the abuser's caring and concern.

For example, the abuser may suggest that the couple spend all their time together because when they are apart, they will miss each other.

Dating violence is a pattern of assaultive and controlling behaviors that one person uses against another in order to gain or maintain power and control in the relationship.

The abuser intentionally behaves in ways that cause fear, degradation and humiliation to control the other person.

The controlling behavior usually escalates, particularly if the victim of the abuse tries to resist or leave.

Types of abuse In a violent relationship, behaviors that are used to maintain fear, intimidation, and power over another person may include threats, intimidation, economic abuse, sexual abuse, taking advantage of male privilege, or using someone's identity against them.

If the victim spends time with other friends, the abuser may appear to be sad or disappointed.