They have been together for nearly half their lives.

Anoymous sex chaty-72

No drugs exist to treat sex addiction; no health care plan specifically covers it; there’s virtually no funding for studies.

Eli Coleman, a psychologist and director of the Program in Human Sexuality at the University of Minnesota, estimates that approximately 19 million Americans—5 to 7 percent of the population—are hypersexual. "We’re all blind in this field," says UCLA neuroscientist Nicole Prause.

Aside from a few desultory wall treatments, there isn’t much of a female presence in the apartment: Ikea couch and armchair, long desk by the window, computer screens.

It may be that Ashley doesn’t go in for decorating.

In high school, Jacob was all-state three times in cross-country; he still runs six to eight miles every day and competes at least once a month in local events.

He has broken this routine only when he’s been lost in the stupor of his addiction.

The movie industry, for its part, has released at least five films on sex addiction in the past five years, six if you count both parts of Lars von Trier’s But even now, sex addiction seems to exist in parallel realities: one in which millions of people are struggling with it, and another in which it is barely studied and not even clinically recognized.

Research has yet to confirm that extreme sexual behavior really is addictive in the same neuroscientific sense that, for instance, habitual heroin use appears to be.

For this reason, many clinicians prefer the term even though they concede that the distinction is mostly semantic.